The Taste of Good Coffee

Roasted coffee beans photographed using a macr...

Roasted coffee beans

Coffee is an important part of many cultures around the world. Beans grown in Colombia, Brazil, Kenya, Jamaica, Hawaii  and other tropical areas are roasted, ground and brewed into a dark aromatic liquid that plays a part in social functions, study habits and even wake-up routines around the world.

The Taste of Good Coffee
Coffee taste characteristics generally feature a bold and full-bodied flavor. With a bitter quality that some drinkers prefer to cut with milk or sweeteners, coffee can be enjoyed in a variety of strengths and taken black (with no added ingredients), light (with cream or milk), sweet or both light and sweet.

Most fine coffees have a nutty finish, and some gourmet or specialty blends feature a fruity intro. Light roast coffees are less pungent than darker roasts and more likely to feature fruity overtones

Much like wines from different vineyards, coffees grown in specific world regions have unique flavor hues. For instance, coffee from Colombia is famous for its rich and round features that spring from the volcanic soil in which the plants are grown while Kenyan coffees frequently have a sharper edge to them, mirroring the somewhat harsher growing environment of central Africa.

Many coffee distributers feature flavored beans as well as blends from various world regions. Popular flavored beans include mocha, hazelnut, amaretto, holiday spice and French vanilla. These flavorings provide a smoother finish to the cup of coffee.

Coffee taste characteristics are also influenced by the brewing method chosen by the coffee enthusiast. Simple “break room” brewing methods involve dumping a measured amount of coffee grounds into a filter through which warmed water is run. Resulting in quick fix for sleepy workers, this coffee is prepared in bulk and is often more acidic and bitter in flavor.

Individual brews can be prepared in an number of different ways to effect coffee taste characteristics. A trip around the world will introduce the coffee drinker to steeped, finely ground cups of Turkish coffee, French pressed brews, the Italian espresso (in a single shot or as a latte or cappuccino with warm milk to temper the coffee’s acidity) and café con leche in parts of Latin America.

As the popularity of enjoying coffee freshly ground and brewed in one’s own kihas increased, so has the choice of low to high cost grinders and French Presses for one or multiple cups of home-brewed goodness.

 

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